The Top 50 Most Millennial-Approved Employers in 2016

June 30, 2016

11:00 am

Employer branding agency Universum Global just released the results of a massive study: 267,084 student respondents from around the world offered answers about their favorite employers. They even broke down the results by the students’ area of study: Tech/IT students had different responses than business students, though plenty of employers turned up on both lists.

The List

Here’s what the tech students had to say about their best employers and favorite potential workplaces, listed from number one to number 50:

Google
Microsoft
Apple
BMW Group
IBM
General Electric (GE)
Intel
Siemens
Samsung
Sony
Procter & Gamble (P&G)
Johnson & Johnson
Ford Motor Company
Shell Oil Company
General Motors (GM)
L’Oréal Group
McKinsey & Company
The Coca-Cola Co.
Daimler/Mercedes-Benz
Volkswagen Group
Goldman Sachs
ExxonMobil
Nestlé
Toyota
Cisco Systems
IKEA
Oracle
J.P. Morgan
3M
The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)
Dell
Deloitte
Unilever
Accenture
Bosch
BASF
Nissan
Pfizer
HP
Lenovo
BP
Schlumberger
Bayer
adidas group
PepsiCo
Schneider Electric
Volvo Cars
PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers)
Novartis
Airbus Group

What It Means

Universum broke down the data a little bit in their study. Most notably, tech students have lost some interest in major tech companies:

“Among engineering students, the tech industry lost a lot of its luster. Hardware-focused companies and electronics manufacturers were particularly hard hit. […] Players in the professional services industry were big winners among engineering and IT students as all are pushing hard to compete with tech companies for top talent.”

Why did tech companies slip?

“Companies like Nokia, HP and Philips were among the hardest hit – each dropping double-digits in their rankings this year. Nokia’s consumer brand suffered after Microsoft acquired its phone business in 2013, then proceeded to write off $8.6 billion over two years to account for the failed investment. And uncertainty over HP’s split (the tech behemoth split into two units, Hewlett Packard Enterprise and HP Inc. in late 2015) likely contributed to its loss.”

Also, local companies didn’t show up on the list, even though they’re king within major regions: Nordstrom, Starbucks and Tesla all did well inside the U.S., for instance. Still, the number of non-tech companies on tech students’ list of best employers is an interesting shift in trends.

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Adam is a writer with an interest in a variety of mediums, from podcasts to comic books to video essays to novels to blogging — too many, basically. He's based out of Seattle, and remains a staunch defender of his state's slogan: "sayWA." In his spare time, he recommends articles about science fiction on Twitter, @AdamRRowe

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