Video: How the Fingo Module Makes VR Hand Tracking Work

January 5, 2017

2:20 pm

The San Jose, Calif.-based AR/VR startup uSens is taking to CES this week to unveil their Fingo module, hand-tracking tech that will allow VR features to easily incorporate your own free-fingered hand movements in real time. It’s a small step for VR that could be a big leap for applied VR everywhere.

How It Works

Hooked to the front of any typical head-mounted display (Samsung Gear, Google Cardboard, Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, you get the point), the Fingo module tracks one or both of the user’s hands, logging a total of 22 different joints per hand. In a demo, users were able to complete such intricate tasks as picking up a VR ring or throwing a VR dart at a VR dartboard. You could even trace your own name as if writing with an anti-gravity 3D pen.

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The Future

uSens’ Fingo tech can handle a 60fps frame rate with a 20 milisecond latency. The company has big plans for the rest of 2017:

uSens looks forward to welcoming new developers to its uDev developer network, refining its computer vision-based HCI solutions, and forging partnerships that will accelerate mass ARVR adoption.

At CES Tuesday night, the company demoed their hand tracker using multiple headsets. Here’s a video look at the types of tricks and tasks the Fingo module can accomplish:

Just as the iPhone brought touchscreens into the mainstream, doing away with the stylus, uSens’ Fingo device seems well-poised to reshape how humans interact with and through the medium of virtual reality.

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Adam is a writer with an interest in a variety of mediums, from podcasts to comic books to video essays to novels to blogging — too many, basically. He's based out of Seattle, and remains a staunch defender of his state's slogan: "sayWA." In his spare time, he recommends articles about science fiction on Twitter, @AdamRRowe

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