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Skurt Is Giving Miami Alternative Transportation: On-Demand Cars

October 12, 2016

10:30 am

Skurt, an on-demand mobility company currently operating in LA, Orange County and San Diego, has come to Miami.

The car rental service works by app: You just download the app, pick what type of car you want, and Skurt will arrive to deliver the car to your doorstep and pick it up once you're finished. Options range from mid-size cars to SUVs, convertibles and luxury options.

Why It's Needed

Skurt brings more convenience to the ever-growing on-demand economy: “no waiting in line or filling out tons of paperwork,” the press release explains. You simply get a car when you need it. The business model is another example of why the “network” model is evolving. Just as social networks are evolving into messaging apps, which deliver information to the people who need it when they need it, so businesses are evolving to deliver their product or service directly to you instead of waiting for you to come to them. Text messages, drone deliveries, and now cars are all sent to you.

“Miami presents a great opportunity for Skurt. It's a place that's embraced the on-demand economy, yet has been somewhat underserved by others in the ecosystem. We're excited to help shape the future of mobility for both residents and visitors alike,” says co-founder Harry Hurst.

It's Free for a Month!

Skurt users in Miami will get free delivery during the first month of operation. Listen up, Miami residents: Locals are the largest percentage of Skurt's customers, so you'll likely find that the affordable and simple service works for you. But you'll also get a free month's worth of a car out of the deal.

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Adam is a writer at Tech.co and has worked as a tech writer, blogger and copy editor for the last decade. He's also a Forbes Contributor on the publishing industry (and Digital Book World 2018 award finalist) and has appeared in publications including Popular Mechanics and IDG Connect. When not glued to TechMeme, he loves obsessing over 1970s sci-fi art.