Mozilla Ends Support for Firefox Password Manager App

Firefox Lockwise will soon stop being supported. Here's what to know and what password management alternatives to consider.
Adam Rowe

In a few weeks, Mozilla will officially end support for Firefox Lockwise: Starting on December 13, 2021, no one will be able to install or re-download the standalone password management app.

However, it's not as dramatic a change as it might seem: Users who rely on the Firefox browser's built-in password management system will be able to continue using it, so the desktop and mobile browser experience will stay the same. The standalone app version, however, doesn't seem to have been worth keeping around.

Here's what to know if you're affected, and a look at a which password management alternatives might be easiest to switch to.

What to Know

Users who have already installed the Firefox Lockwise app by December 13 will still be able to use it just fine. The final releases will be iOS version 1.8.1 and Android version 4.0.3. However, over time these versions will be come outdated, and if there's one piece of software that you'll want to be fully debugged, it's the one that holds all of your sensitive login information.

The announcement is fairly short, with no explanation for why Mozilla is discontinuing the service aside from one hint that it plans to pivot in a different direction:

“Firefox for iOS will already sync your saved Lockwise passwords,” Mozilla says in a note on the announcement. “You can currently only use those inside Firefox. Check back for updates in December 2021 on how to use Firefox for iOS as your system-wide password manager.”

In other words, more news might be on the way that could reveal another Mozilla product to serve as a replacement for the Firefox Lockwise app, complete with access to all the password info that previous users would have relied on. But that doesn't mean they have to keep using it.

Firefox Lockwise alternatives

Password managers are crucial tools for keeping track of all your login information without relying on repeating passwords or holding on to the same ones for years on end.

Businesses that rely on remote access for all their employees should pick a dependable password manager to make available company-wide. And as this news about Firefox Lockwise sunsetting drives home, you can't rely on all management tools (particularly the free ones) to stick around for the long terms. Here are the ones we'd recommend paying for.

Lockwise didn't have all the features that many top password management solution boast. While it remains to be seen what features Mozilla might be revealing in the near future, it's a safe bet that the biggest and best password tools will remain our long-time top picks.

The best is LastPass, with packed features that include file attachment support, auto logins, a notes section, and a password generator. 1Password comes in at a healthy second place, with a nice set of business features like unlimited vault storage and admin controls with user permissions.

Dashlane, NordPass, and Sticky Password are all worth considering as well. Here's our table comparing their core features, support options, and pricing.

0 out of 0
Local Storage Option
Two-Factor Authentication
Failsafe Function
Password Generator Function
A password manager can create secure, complex passwords for you. You won't need to remember them yourself.
Help Instructions
Email Support
Live Chat Support
Phone Support
Price
Overall cost per year for a single user.
Business Plan?
Business Price
Cheapest available business plan
Click to Try

LastPass

1Password

Dashlane

NordPass

Sticky Password

$36

$36

$60

$29.88

$30

$3/user/month

$19.95/10 users

$60/user

$3.59/user/month

$29.99/user

Did you find this article helpful? Click on one of the following buttons
We're so happy you liked! Get more delivered to your inbox just like it.

We're sorry this article didn't help you today – we welcome feedback, so if there's any way you feel we could improve our content, please email us at contact@tech.co

Adam is a writer at Tech.co and has worked as a tech writer, blogger and copy editor for more than a decade. He's also a Forbes Contributor on the publishing industry, for which he was named a Digital Book World 2018 award finalist. His work has appeared in publications including Popular Mechanics and IDG Connect, and he has an art history book on 1970s sci-fi coming out from Abrams Books in 2022. In the meantime, he's hunting own the latest news on VPNs, POS systems, and the future of tech.

Explore More See all news
close Building a Website? We've tested and rated Wix as the best website builder you can choose – try it yourself for free Try Wix today