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Apple Updates MacBook Keyboard, Extends Repair Program

May 22, 2019

7:59 am

Apple has announced an update to its Mac keyboard repair program, after many users have complained about stuck keys and mis-presses. The ongoing issues have angered even the most loyal Apple fans.

Apple hasn’t sat on its laurels, and has issued several fixes. Yet still the problem won’t go away. It seems that the ‘butterfly’ design of recent MacBook keyboards should have spent a bit longer in the chrysalis.

On the eve of its latest MacBook Pro release, the company has included some newer models into the program, including its very latest MacBook Pro, which even comes with an ‘improved’ keyboard.

The Problem with MacBook Keyboards

The issues with MacBook keyboards over the past few years have provided Apple with something of a headache. The issue stems from the butterfly keyboards found on recent MacBooks, with users complaining of mis-pressed keys or unintentional double presses, or, in some cases, the keys getting stuck altogether. Some users have claimed that the butterfly mechanism, which is notably thinner than the previous ‘scissor’ mechanism used by Apple, can be disrupted by tiny particles of dust.

While Apple has addressed the problem over the years with revisions to the mechanism, including yet another iteration for the latest MacBook Pro range announced this week, consumers feel that it hasn’t gone far enough.

We don’t know the numbers for how many people have been affected with malfunctioning keyboards, but social media is awash with people complaining. Some have even set up petitions to change the design, garnering signatures into the tens of thousands.

While Apple has taken action and been back to the drawing board several times, its messaging to the public has been that the issue only affects a small number of users. That’s slim comfort for those who are patiently waiting for their appointment at the Genius bar.

Apple’s Keyboard Solution

While the constant redesigns appear to have had little effect on the underlying issue, Apple has also implemented a repair program, which it has recently extended to cover newer models.

In somewhat mixed messaging, the company has included its just-announced MacBook Pro range into the program. That’s right, the latest model, that comes with the new, improved keyboard, is also eligible for keyboard repairs.

While it’s reassuring that purchasers of the pricey MacBooks are covered if the keyboard misbehaves, it does somewhat call into question Apple’s own faith in the fix. The new iteration marks the 4th version of the butterfly keyboard for Apple – how many more can we expect to see?

How Do I Get My MacBook Keyboard Fixed?

If you’re experiencing a stuck key or any unusual behavior from your MacBook keyboard, then you’re in luck, as you are probably eligible for a free repair under Apple’s program. It covers a wide range of models from the past few years:

  • MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, Early 2015)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12­-inch, Early 2016)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, 2017)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13­-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2017)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2019)

If yours is included the above, you can make an appointment at your local Apple store to get the issue resolved. Apple has come into criticism recently for long waiting times, but assure customers that they have been working to reduce these. The fix from Apple may involve replacing a single key, or could mean an entirely new keyboard.

You can book your repair in at the Apple website‘s dedicated repair program page.

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Jack is the Content Manager for Tech.co. He has been writing about a broad variety of technology subjects for over a decade, both in print and online, including laptops and tablets, gaming, and tech scams. As well as years of experience reviewing the latest tech devices, Jack has also conducted investigative research into a number of tech-related issues, including privacy and fraud.