Facebook Login Buttons Aren’t As Popular Anymore

Today's internet users just aren't that interested in tying their social media accounts to other websites they visit.
Adam Rowe

Social logins are on the decline: Dell has recently joined the fast-growing group of companies that have removed the buttons from their website homepages.

You've likely used or at least seen these third-party login options in the past. They allow users to log into a new website without creating an account from scratch. And while we're all still ordering online and logging into just as many websites, the amount of third-party social logins through platforms like Facebook and Twitter are on the decline.

Why? Mostly security concerns. Here's what any business or website needs to know.

Users Want to “Isolate” Their Social Accounts

Dell dropped social logins on its websites in the past month, CNBC reports. In doing so, the company joins — deep breath — Best Buy, Ford Motor, Pottery Barn, Nike, Patagonia, Match, and Twitch.

Even just a few years earlier, social logins were a common way to make it simple for a user to join a site with just a few clicks. Reducing friction can be a huge boon for an ecommerce website, so the service a social login provides is pretty clear.

These days, though, the general public is more aware than ever of the security breaches and the potentially privacy-violating data collection practices common to major tech companies.

“We really just looked at how many people were choosing to use their social media identity to sign in, and that just has shifted over time. One thing that we see across the industry is more and more security risks or account takeovers, whether that’s Instagram or Facebook or whatever it might be, and I just think we’re observing people making a decision to isolate that social media account versus having other connections to it.” ~Jen Felch, Dell’s chief digital and chief information officer

In 2022, people just aren't as interested in tying their social media accounts to other websites they visit. Facebook, along with other social platforms, has a waning power within the internet ecosystem.

Stop Trying to Make Social Logins Happen

The takeaway here is that any small business that's trying to establish an online presence or any online business that's finetuning its existing website may want to reconsider offering any social logins. Users are less likely to opt for them, and it might even send the wrong message about how seriously your operation takes security concerns.

Instead, a simple account-creatation template — typically available from any website builder service that support ecommerce websites — will likely work just as well.

Social media can still have its own place, however, since it remains a useful arm of advertising and marketing campaigns.

If any of that information sounds useful to you, check out our guide to the best ecommerce-specific website builders, where we break down all the features you'll need, and which providers might be best for your particular needs. Shopify and Wix are a few of the best options.

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Adam is a writer at Tech.co and has worked as a tech writer, blogger and copy editor for more than a decade. He's also a Forbes Contributor on the publishing industry, for which he was named a Digital Book World 2018 award finalist. His work has appeared in publications including Popular Mechanics and IDG Connect, and he has an art history book on 1970s sci-fi coming out from Abrams Books in 2022. In the meantime, he's hunting own the latest news on VPNs, POS systems, and the future of tech.

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